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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military but by civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing:
in libya. rebels flee as qaddafi's military advances and now a fierce debate-- should the u.s. arm the opposition? i'm erica hill. also tonight, kicking the habit: the president wants to cut oil imports by a third, and some drivers have already gotten the message. hyperactive kids-- why some experts believe artificial food coloring could make the behavior worse. >> mr. president! >> and a bullet meant for president reagan nearly took this man's life. 30 years later james brady is still fighting for gun control. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening, katie is off tonight. just two days ago, libyan rebels seemed ready to move on moammar qaddafi's home town and possibly on tripoli, but tonight, they are on the move in the other direction. their weapons, machine guns for the most part are, no match for qaddafi's heavier weaponry. secretary of state hillary clinton said today no decision has been made about whether to arm the rebels, but there are also reports that president obama
across the pacific to the u.s. reaching the west coast. japan declares a state of emergency at a nuclear plant as radiation levels surge. the area around it is evacuated. and the ring of fire. why this area of the pacific is so vulnerable to earthquakes. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it is saturday morning in japan. the sun is up and the extent of the catastrophe is becoming painfully clear. it's been nearly 24 hours since a powerful earthquake touched off a huge tsunami that swept across japan's east coast. the quake, a magnitude 8.9, was the fifth-largest in modern history. centered off japan's northeast coast, it was felt for 1,300 miles. very early reports say more than 400 people are dead. japan's kyoto news agency says the final number is expected to top 1,000. most of the victims drowned. nearly 1,000 are reported injured, more than 500 are missing. and four million homes and businesses lost power. the first estimate of the damage: $10 billion. that dama
are soaring and the area is being evacuated. most flights between the u.s. and japan have been canceled, and there were fear it is tsunami would pound the u.s., but by the time the waves reached hawaii and the west coast this morning, they had lost most of their punch. president obama said he's heartbroken by the disaster. u.s. assistance is already on the way to japan. lucy craft is there. >> reporter: the monster quake, thought to be the largest in japan's history triggered a ferocious series of tsunamis. a 23-foot wall of water poured over the northern japanese coastline with little warning. only minutes after the quick hit sweeping away everything and everyone in its path. cars were tossed like toys. boats were battered by the tides. this tanker was swept up on to the shore. another ship fought to escape a massive whirlpool. and the state of the boat and its crew is unknown. >> a tsunami obviously coming in several sweeps. >> reporter: minutes later a a second deadly wave. surging water overtook coastal city streets, ripping fishing boats from their moorings and swamping buildings.
you! [ laughter ] >> couric: tonight, japan asks for u.s. help cooling nuclear reactors damaged by the earthquake as it tries desperately to prevent meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the unfolding humanitarian crisis. four days after the earthquake and tsunami, there are shortages of food and housing for the living. body bags and coffins for the growing number of dead. the search goes on for victims in towns virtually wiped off the map. and how safe are we with nuclear plants here at home built on fault lines and striking distances of tsunamis. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone, any one of them alone would be overwhelming, but japan is dealing with three crises: humanitarian, economic, and nuclear, including the possibility of a meltdown. we'll have much more about that in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10
that could cost him his job. a federal agent tells cbs news he was ordered to let guns from the u.s. make their way to mexican drug cartels. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama's message to qaddafi. >> the violence must stop. moammar qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave. >> couric: with the threat of a lockout hanging over the players n.f.l. contract talks go into overtime. and sea otters under attack from sharks and something more mysterious. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they are two presidents leading a war against a common enemy: mexican drug cartels. president obama welcomed mexico's president felipe calderon to the white house today and mr. obama said the two countries are making progress against drug gangs. >> to combat the southbound flow of guns and money we are screening all southbound rail cargo, seizing many more guns bound for mexico and we are putting more gunrunners behind bars. >> couric: but one of the men on the
another. >> reporter: but republicans say a spike in u.s. jihadist terror plots justify their focus. between may of 2009 and november, 2010, arrests were made for 22 such plots-- more than in the previous seven years combined. >> there is that small element in the community that's radicalizing. >> reporter: poisoning the atmosphere was king's own past assertion-- that most u.s. mosques are run by radicals. >> cleaning a dirty kitchen you can't clean it with dirty water. >> reporter: king is from long island and his relations with muslim leaders there deteriorated after 9/11. >> we have some serious concerns because congressman king has been a muslim barber. >> reporter: keith ellison, one of two muslim congressmen, broke down as he recalled a paramedic killed on 9/11 who was later smeared because of his muslim faith. >> his life should not be identify as just a member of the ethnic group or just a member of a religion. >> reporter: despite the tension, king called this his happiest day. >> i challenge anyone to find anything that was improper about today's hearing. >> reporter: in f
the tactic letting guns walk. in this case into the hands of criminals who would use them in mexico and the u.s. doddson's bosses say that never happened. now he's risking his job to go public. >> i'm boots on the ground here in phoenix and telling you we've been doing it everyday since i've been here. here i am. tell me i didn't do the things that i did. tell me you didn't order me to do the things i did. tell me it didn't happen. now you have a name on it, you have a face to put with it. here i am. someone. now tell me it didn't happen. >> reporter: agent doddson and other insiders say the gun-walking strategy was approved all the way to the justice department. the idea was to see where the guns ended up, build a big case and take down a major cartel and it was all kept secret from mexico. a.t.f. named the case "fast and furious." this surveillance video obtained by cbs news shows suspected drug cartel suppliers carrying boxes of weapons to their cars at a phoenix gun shop. those long boxes being loaded into the red car are a.k.-47 type assault rifles. >> reporter: so it turns out a.t.f. not
today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear complex in just three days injured 11 workers. like saturday's initial explosion, today's blast destroyed the reactor's exterior though officials say its core is intact. this was followed by news another reactor in the complex is also overheating so the prospect of a third explosion is l
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)